Category Archives: Parents

For parents of children with autism

Related Activities …

Table tennis

Have you discovered the free outdoor table tennis in Wyndham Park, Grantham ?       It is next to the tennis courts.      See map to find the park at  NG31 9BA.

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These activities and events are not run by GAIN but could be of interest.        See also:  Wider area activities  and  Local groups  for the surrounding area around Grantham.       For holidays in Lincolnshire see Take a break.

Grantham Lynx SwimLynx Swim logo

  • Grantham Lynx Disability Swimming Club.
  • Meets Wednesdays 6.30pm -7.30pm Grantham Meres.
  • New members and volunteers always welcome.

Just turn up at the Meres.      As you go in there will be a table on the right with two ladies and the Lynx swimming sign.      They do not swim in school holidays, that includes half terms. *      Click icon to find them on Facebook or Twitter.      They include some community news from members.

Rainbow Flyers Youth ClubRainbow Flyers Youth Club

This is a special needs club at Ruskington Youth Centre, NG34 9DY, on Sundays 3-5pm.           Ruskington is a village near Sleaford.          Parents can simply turn up with their children.       They would love to see some new faces.       Click image on the left to find out what is what.        See local groups for more information.

Little Jack’s Farm

Little Jack’s Farm is a family run children’s farm on the outskirts of Bottesford.      See map

Grantham Making Noise

At Guildhall Arts Centre      1st and 3rd Saturdays of the month: 12:30 – 14:30          Click icon for more information.       Perhaps a good place to find out what is happening at present would be cotact us.       See also:  article.

The Groove

An exciting, fun-filled night for adults with disabilities aged 16+, their families and support workers.      Guildhall Arts Centre Ballroom, Grantham.       Click icon for the Guildhall contact us page – perhaps a good way to find out what is happening at present.

Grantham College Day Break

For a personalised day opportunity for adults with a learning disability, see:  Brochure         Introduction         Webpage

Lincolnshire Parent Carer Forum (LPCF) Coffee Mornings

This is the new name for Lincolnshire Parent Carer Forum (LPCF).
No need to book.      Meet other parents of children with disabilities and additional needs.          

10.30am – 12 mid-day,   every 2 months at Urban Hotel, Swingbridge Road, Grantham, NG31 7XT,    map.          For dates see website.

Drama groups

Is your child a born performer?

  • The New Youth Theatre has 4 age groups, ranging from 3 – 16 years of age.
  • The Happy Little Drama Club for started on 8 September 2014.        They have 2 age groups ranging from 8 – 13 years of age.

Both groups above are in Grantham.       These are mainstream groups.       See Wider area for a group in Lincoln specifically set up for children with additional needs.        See The Science page under Drama & Performance activities for information about possible benefits.

What’s on

Keep up to date with arts, leisure and culture in South Kesteven.         Click icon for more information.

Take part in research – Just dance

Just dance

Researchers at the University of Essex are currently working on a new project that involves autistic children playing the exercise game Just Dance with their parent or primary caregiver at home.      Online taster session on 15 September 2021.     Click icon to find out more.

GAIN was contacted by Phoebe Morris (MBPsS). PhD Studentship at the University of Essex.

Cambridge research

Would you like to register with the Autism Research Centre (ARC) at the University of Cambridge, headed by Professor Simon Baron-Cohen.   They aim  to understand the biomedical causes of autism spectrum conditions, and develop new and validated methods for assessment and intervention.      They are looking for adults and parents of children with an autism diagnosis. 
Click PDF icon for poster or twitter icon for updates about taking part.
See also:  website        volunteers

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Archive

School environment

This is a study of the ways in which a changed school environment has affected primary school children with ASD.    Would any parents/carers with a child aged 5-15 who has been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum disorder like to take part in three online questionnaires?       Click icon for a letter from the researcher and a link to the first survey.

Sleep study

The University of York is running a project charting the early sleep patterns of infants at risk of developing Autism Spectrum Disorders.     If you have a baby with an older brother or sister with Autism they would love to hear from you.     This project explores sleep patterns in infant siblings through the use of sleep diaries.     Click icon for poster.     See also official project information.   The university will provide all items and materials as needed.       (Posted Oct 2017)

Child study

Are you a woman with autism?      Are you pregnant?      Click icon for the study poster.       Here is the study summary.     See also the website associated with their email address.

Carer technology

Would you be interested in taking part in a 3 month trial of a technology package to assist in co-ordinating home care?

1.      It provides the person being cared for with greater social interaction with their friends and family as well as reminding them to take their medication.
2.      Gives Carers the peace of mind with information about the person they are caring for such as through movement sensors confirming that they have visiting the toilet, opened the fridge door or medicine cabinet.         This is done by setting up various sensors and equipment, such as blood pressure monitors that can be linked to the technology.

See:   Technology       Letter        Form         Everyone website – emerging from Lincolnshire Carers & Young Carers Partnership (LCYCP)

Button - playNon-compliance behaviour

Could you spare some time for a telephone interview for a research project.            Click button for a video introduction.

Here is a little bit of background information about the project, that could be posted up to accompany the video:

We are researchers at the School of Psychology, Queen’s University Belfast and our project focuses on children’s non-compliance behaviour.
Non-compliance behaviour is when a child:

  • Ignore your requests…
  • Tries to talk their way out of doing things
  • Directly defies you
  • Says “no” a lot

Almost all children show some of these behaviours, but some children with autism seem to struggle especially with these sorts of behaviours.
Surprisingly little research has been carried out on why some children particularly struggle with non-compliance.    We aim to find out more about the factors that can influence the non-compliant behaviour children show so that we can start to develop bespoke helping strategies specifically designed for these behaviours.

We would like to hear from you if you are a caregiver of a child aged 5-11 years old who frequently shows the behaviour described above, and who behaves like this across different settings and where you feel the behaviour may be having a negative impact on the child and/or on the family. 

In this initial study, we would like caregivers to take part in an interview over the phone to talk about the behaviour.      Everyone who takes part will receive a feedback report about what we have found when this initial study is finished and we will update any families who wish with information about our ongoing progress in this project and future participation opportunities.

If you are interested in hearing more about the study and would like more information, please contact:

  • Katherine Grady:          kgrady01@qub.ac.uk                07926 076 790 
  • Luke McCann:               lmccann32@qub.ac.uk
  • Kate Woodcock:            k.woodcock@qub.ac.uk            028 9097 4886

The interviews are due to be completed by the end of June 2016.

Self-Injurious Behaviour

This was an on-line survey.      The project leader said, We have developed two new questionnaires which measure beliefs about suicide and nonsuicidal self-injury.        Dr Andy Siddaway

See also  Support sheet       Stirling University

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Not getting out

Learning a new skill

How do you learn to go out of the house when you’ve got agoraphobia?      Click icon to listen to a radio interview with Ellie.

NHS

The NHS section on not getting out, or Agoraphobia, gives us a pretty clear picture of  established scientific opinion.      Click icon to browse.      There is a link to treatment – including self-help tips.

National autistic society

Searching the National Autistic Society site for agoraphobia leads to a page on anxiety.     Although it is aimed at professionals It may provide some useful context.      Click icon to view.      Under the sub-heading Are autistic people more likely to be anxious? they include fear of open spaces and crowds.

They also have a handy article on Anxietyy in autistic adults.       It provides links for autistic adults and parents.

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Introduction

Just a quick tip:  perhaps you could try using one of the following statements:

  1. “I can be anxious and still deal with the situation.”
  2. “I’ll just let my body do its thing. This will pass.”
  3. “This anxiety won’t hurt me, even if it doesn’t feel good”.
  4. “This feeling isn’t comfortable or pleasant, but I can accept it.”

Experiences

Click icon to find out how others have found their way through panic attacks.        Also, someone with high-functioning Asperger’s describes their own experience dealing with anxiety.

More detailPanic attacks etc

  • What is the range of symptoms?
  • Can people with high functioning Asperger’s be severely effected by
    anxiety?      It seems so:
    – High functioning autism is associated with anxiety disorder.
    – A discussion of the link between high IQ and anxiety
  • Can virtual reality help with not getting out?      Video           Text           Research

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Treatments & Therapies

Occupational therapy

Why is occupational therapy important for autistic children?       Although this article is aimed at professionals it can give parents some idea about help that is out there.      Click icon to see National Autistic Society article.      See also the NHS page about occupational therapy.

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See also Specialist services under the heading Cauldwell Autism Services.

Colouring books

Click icon for a review of  The Healthy Coping Colouring Book and Journal.      Have a look at Amazon for this book and others like it.      People say that they are more than simple colouring books.

Can autism be cured?

Autism is a life-long condition – it cannot be cured.      But there are a range of methods of enabling  and assisting learning and development.

Responsive Communication

The Caldwell Autism Foundation is building a network of skilled practitioners across the UK to provide Responsive Communication support.       Click icon for the website.         It seeks to address the needs of hard to reach individuals.        Click play button for a list of video clips.      They offer detailed insights into the way the autistic mind works.       

Food Challenges

Click icon to view Options helpsheet, Facing food challenges for those with autism & sensory processing differences.

Dance movement psychotherapy

Options Group has produced a help sheet about dance movement psychotherapy.      They say that it is about creating a safe place in which to explore movement, dance, props and play.      See Specialist services about Options Group.

Rapid Prompting Method

Establishing the effectiveness of an approach to helping children with autism can be vexing.     The Rapid Prompting Method (RPM) is a relatively new communication technique developed for people with severe autism.       It is controversial and is, at best, only applicable in a minority of cases.       Click icon for more about it.     

Here is an intelligent Critique.      The author believes that the method is still at an exploratory stage.      He is, at time of writing, sceptical about its potential.

Asperger Experts

Danny Raede has discovered for himself ways of understanding and coping with the difficulties he experiences as someone on the spectrum.       He has formed Asperger Experts to guide and support others in the same boat.       See:  about us

Click icon for his website and look under the Browse menu option.        This part of the website is free to all.

Counselling

See Kooth on-line support in Growing up or Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Adults.

Aroma-therapy & reflexology

To ease symptoms of stress, you might consider aroma-therapy or reflexology.

Sensory rooms

Where funds allow it may be possible to adapt a room in your own home.       GAIN cannot recommend any items of equipment or their use.       Just to give you an idea of what is available, here is one source of sensory equipment.       Here are some ideas of who might benefit and what could be selected.

Emotional & mental well-being

While autism is about development rather than mental health, people with autism may have mental health issues too.      See Emotional well-being in Growing up for resources and services in Lincolnshire.

Key terms

Psychology, psychiatry and psychotherapy:  NHS

Neurodiversity is a concept and a movement in support of people on the autistic spectrum.
It holds that autism is a valid way of being.

Money

Personal Budget

If a child or young person has an Education, Health and Care (EHC) Plan, or who has been assessed as needing an EHC plan, then a personal SEND budget can be requested.      Click icon for a factsheet from Contact.       See also NHS guide.

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See also Money 16+

Turn 2 us

Turn2us is a national UK charity providing practical help to people who are struggling financially.      Click icon to browse.      Look out for their benefits calculator.

Welfare benefits

Carers FIRST is the new name for Carers connect.      Click icon for their welfare benefits page.       More broadly, to find out how Carers FIRST fits in with Lincolnshire Carers Service see Families.

Contact has several pages about benefits.      The Disability Living Allowance (DLA) page may be the most interesting but there are others listed in the left margin too.

Official information

Housing

Housing benefits or Council tax support may be available if someone in your household is on a low income.      Click icon for specifics.

Money Matters

This is a guide for parents of disabled children who want to know what financial help may be available to them and what arrangements they may need to make to manage their children’s finances from birth and as they get older.

Family Fund

They provide grants to low-income families with disabled children.        Fill in their application form and post it to their office in York.        For more information click on the icon below.Family fund logoA representative attended a Lincolnshire Parent Carer Council coffee morning in Grantham, in 2012, to promote the scheme.

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SEN/EHC Information

SEND local offer

Click the icon to see the Lincolnshire County Council guide to SEN & disability local offer.       It includes Where to start

Official guidance

Liaise is Lincolnshire’s Special Educational Needs and Disability Information, Advice and Support Service

Click the icon on the left for an introduction to Liaise – an official source SEND information.      new        It has some brief video introductions.

Click icon on the right to browse a single overall guide.       It touches on the Graduated Approach under the heading Working Together Team – page 27.       For more about this approach see:  Graduated Approach

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Ace Education

ACE Education provides independent information for parents on education issues in England.       Click icon for an introduction to Special Educational Needs and related issues.       See also home      parents – for more educational issues

EHC plans

An education health and care plan sets out how children and young people should receive support for their special educational needs (SEN) at school and college.       Click icon for the National Autistic Society’s guide.        See also the official outline.

Team around the child

Team around the child has put together a guide in the form of letters to parents and professionals to introduce key experiences faced by many families in this situation and to highlight their needs.        Click icon to browse the guide intended to support families of children with complex needs and the professionals who care for them.        See also background.

Look it up

Contact offers a range of pages to do with education & learning with SEN.       Click icon to browse.

Parents’ View

The Special needs Jungle is a parent-led resource offering information and informed opinion about children and young people with SEN.

  • See  SEND flowcharts      EHC plans  for example.
  • Their SEND Info menu, at top of screen, offers more detail about Special Educational Needs.        Hover over it to see what is there.
  • Education may be linked to health these days.         See their Health menu.
  • Also, how are the SEN & Disability reforms of 2014 going?       See Education News.

SPELL

SPELL is a framework for understanding and responding to the needs of children and adults with autism.       It stands for Structure, Positive approaches and expectations, Empathy, Low arousal, Links.      Click icon to find out more.

SEND code of practice

The SEND code of practice lays out the statutory guidance for organisations such as schools who work with children who have Special Educational Needs.        Liase talks about it as the parent’s bible for SEND meetings.       Alternatively, see publication.

  • Chapter 6 – This chapter applies mostly to mainstream schools. (Page 91)       Liase says to print this chapter and use highlighters and a pencil to note each paragraph for use at your SEN meeting at school.
  • Chapter 9 – This chapter covers all the key stages in statutory assessment and planning and preparing the Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan.

2014 SEND changes

Education Health and Care plans were introduced in 2014, replacing the Statement of Educational Needs.        Click icon to find out how things changed.

Troubleshooting

Our SEN/EHC Support page has quite a bit of information that could help with troubleshooting.        Click icon to view.

Lincolnshire short breaks

Lincolnshire County Council offers a Short Breaks service for families living in Lincolnshire who have a child with a disability between 0 – 18 years.

Every-One provides subsidised short breaks on behalf of Lincolnshire County Council.     The picture on the left shows specially adapted accommodation that is available at Skegness.     There is a variety of activities on offer.

For more information see:

Sensory Sensitivity

Too much information

The National Autistic Society ran a public information campaign from 2015-18 called too much information.       It addressed concerns surrounding autistic people becoming overwhelmed with too much for their minds to process.       Click icon for the full picture.       It may help to validate your own experience.

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Sensory differences

Click icon to see an article from the National Autistic Society.      They say that many people on the autism spectrum have difficulty processing everyday sensory information.

  • It covers many possibilities.
  • Senses may be over or under sensitive.
  • Therapies are listed at the bottom
  • Further reading too

SPD

Sensory Processing Disorder is another name for the condition that you may see referred to using similar names like Sensory Integration Difficulties.      Click icon to find out about it from Sensory Integration Education (UK).

  • The Star Institute, USA,  has a couple of concisely presented pages:   What is SPD?       SPD and other disorders
  • The Sensory Processing Disorder website seems to have an international reach:  Home       Q & A – e.g.  UK mum – from a UK mother.
  • Stimming can be a useful coping mechanism for people with sensory sensitivities.      For coping with sensory overload see Why does that happen?.
  • If you are considering therapy or study on a course this scientific research might be worth a look.

Food challenges

Options Group have produced a helpsheet – Facing food challenges for those with autism & sensory processing differences.       The author is one of their specialist occupational therapists.      Click icon to view.

Quiet opticians

Lunettes in George Shopping Centre, GranthamNG31 6LH, offers SEND friendly eye care.      Click icon for more information.

Specsavers in Lincoln High Street, LN5 7DW, held its first quiet clinic on Sunday 6th August 2017, 10am until 4pm with the next one being on Sunday 3rd September and then the first Sunday of every month,        These clinics have been planned in consultation with local support groups such as Canadda and PAACT.      Click icon for more information.

Haircut

There is no shortage of advice for coping with sensory sensitivity when getting a child’s hair cut.

A haircut technique

One barber has developed a unique technique where he will cut a child’s hair during long periods while sitting on the floor, on window sills or even in the car.       See article with video clip.

Going to the dentist

  • This article was written by an autism parent after a trip to the dentist.      The first half of this is the How Did We Get Here part.       The second is How Can You Maybe Get Here part. 
  • Many of us dread the thought of visiting the dentist but for people with autism and/or learning difficulties it can be an especially challenging experience.       See:  helpsheet

Sensory library

Linkage has a sensory toy library.      The Linkage Sensory Library is a new venture that will bring fun, learning and the therapeutic benefits of using sensory equipment to people with disabilities, including those with learning difficulties, across Greater Lincolnshire.       Click icon on the left for more information.       They have sites in Toynton, Grimsby and from September 2017, Lincoln.       They also have a touring bus.       See also website.

Ear plugs

Vibes are earplugs that are designed not to block outside noise, but to lower the volume.       Like many people with autism, Noah, From Ohio, hears noises much, much louder than the rest of us.       His father says Noah first tried them at a play, when he felt agitated by the noise.       See:  Vibes          FAQ         Amazon.       There are also alternatives.       Please be aware that GAIN is unable to vouch for any of the ear plugs.

Sensory issues

This booklet givers an occupational therapist’s view.       It addresses how to read the signs and coping strategies.

 

Education and learning

Early Years

At ages 3-4 ALL children qualify for 15 hours a week free education.       Some may also qualify for free places aged 2.
See: in brief        Lincolnshire       new

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Lincolnshire Council sets out more general information under the heading:  Early years education

Mainstream school

With mainstream schools, smaller ones may provide a more calm and adaptable environment for pupils with additional needs.

The National Autistic Society has several pages about Education.       Click icon to browse.        In particular one of these pages sets out how to get extra help in mainstream school / college.

Additional needs

For children with an Education Health & Care plan a more specialised environment may be offered by schools for additional needs.        Here is a guide to choosing a special school.         Click icon for more about SEN.

Parents in the Grantham area might find a place for their child at:

  • F-footerTwitter small iconAmbergate Sports College & Sandon SchoolGANF caters for pupils aged 3 – 19 with moderate to severe learning difficulties and complex needs.        Many are on the autistic spectrum.      Grantham
  • Greenfields Academy is a Specialist School for SEMH pupils (Social, Emotional, Mental Health) aged 4 to 16 years.      Grantham      (previously  Phoenix Academy)
  • Gosberton House Academy is a specialist primary school mainly for children with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder.       Near Spalding

More pages

                               

Lunch and break time

Unstructured time at school can be particularly tricky.      The National Autistic Society has created a guide for parents and carers to understanding and coping with difficulties at lunch and break times.       Click icon to view.

Autism discussion

Bill Nason developed the Autism Discussion Page to discuss tools that help children on the spectrum feel safe, accepted and competent.       Click Facebook icon to browse.       He has written an article for Autism Parenting magazine with the title, Can my child ever learn to live on his own?       Click page icon to view.  

He has also written a few books, notably The Autism Discussion Page on the core challenges of autism: A toolbox for helping children with autism feel safe, accepted, and competent.      See Amazon       Good Reads

Making it work

Getting what your child needs may put parents up against difficulties and obstacles.        Professionals may try to fob you off to begin with suggesting that things might sort themselves out – perhaps partly because they do not see your child at home.       See:  GAIN tips.

Ambitious about Autism has a lot of online discussion about educational issues.      See website: www.ambitiousaboutautism.org.uk
Twitter has a link to the website at the top of its display.       Look for the magnifying glass icon on their site to search.

School Transport

Cereba, the UK based charity, has produced a booklet about School Transport.        It lays out the basis for the local authority to decide whether a child cannot reasonably walk to school.        See also Cereba website.

Schooling problems

High-functioning children can be very resourceful, but it may take some time for them to get on top of things.

School refuser:  Read about the experience of a  Teenage girl  and a  Teenage boy .        They show very different approaches on the part of the parents.       Both are taken from the same on-line  Discussion .

Learning to read:   In this case things suddenly clicked at the age of 7.

Secondary school:   One of our committee members says,  I found my first year at Kings’ School a bit intimidating.    There were quite a few in my class who were clearly much more clever than me.       I was much more comfortable in the second year, having been put in a class based on my grades at the end of the first year.

Tips & issues

Family relationships

The National Autistic Society has a range of guides for navigating family relationships, and advice for parents, siblings, and children on how to support their autistic family member.       Click icon to find out more.

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See also Coronavirus resources

Spectrum magazine

The National Autistic Society publishes The spectrum magazine, containing autistic art, poetry and prose.       Created by autistic people, its content covers all things autism.         Click icon to find out more.       For example Oct 2020 issue.

Contact

Contact – for families with disabled children – was founded by parents.     They seem to know what is what.      Click icon to get to the point.

The podcast university

What to do if you are at a loose end?       This is basically a plug for a number of BBC podcasts that might pique your interest.       Click icon to view.

Thinking styles

  • Temple Grandin says that there are three autistic thinking styles:  visual thinkers, verbal specialists and pattern thinkers.       See post.
  • Autism Toolbox is  a resource to foster inclusion in early learning settings and schools.       it has a section on cognitive theories of autism.

Facbook small iconAutism Discussion

Autism Discussion Page is the title of this Facebook page.       It contains brief articles with comments.       Anyone registered with Facebook can add their own comments.

Making your child happier

This article offers Eleven ways you can make your autistic child’s life easier.

Temple Grandin’s FAQ’s

Temple Grandin is a lady with high-functioning Asperger’s who has made an academic career for herself.       Click icon to browse her Frequently Asked Questions page.       The Ask Temple link, in the top left corner, gives you a form for asking your own question.

Ellen Notbohm

This Facebook page offers a handy starting point for several topics from the author Ellen Notbohm.       The award-winning author is known for her popular books and columns on autism, published worldwide in more than twenty languages.       See the Notes option on the Facebook page for key topics.        She also has a website.      The Blog and Articles menu options might be worth a look.

Facbook small iconAutism on The Mighty

We have a number of links from The Mighty on our website and Facebook page.        This page picks out autism related material from their website.       Click icon to browse.

NetmumsDoc icon

  • The Netmums site has quite a few pages  under the Autism/Asperger’s heading.      Clicking the icon to browse.
  • A number of mothers post a description of their situation on this  site – see:  Preschool        School age         Older children / teenagers.
  • To simply browse Netmums use their search box at the top right corner of the page, but for information about the members’ only areas see their registration page,

Evidence-based optimism

The thinking person’s guide to autism is a forum intended to encourage visitors, To think, ask questions, question the media, and learn from each other       The people behind it say, Autism misinformation clouds and is perpetuated by the Internet.     We want to make accurate information about autism causation and therapies visible, accessible, and centralized.

Christmas 

Ambitious About Autism is publishing a few tips for Christmas under the heading: Include autism this Christmas.      Click icon to view.

Coping skills

Six types of coping skills.      An array of graphics.

The best activities

Ideas about activities for special needs.      After-school and weekend activities for children with disabilities can build self-esteem, skills, friendships and a sense of belonging.

What autism mums do not want to hear

This will ring a few bells for parents of a child on the autistic spectrum.      Things not to say to an autism mum .

Re-charging the batteries

‘Society has programmed us to think, “What kind of mother is she, taking care of herself before her child?”  but that’s completely wrong.’      Here are 10 must dos for parents of children with special needs.

Scope

Scope describes itself as the disability equality charity.

  • Members ask the online community for Support and Information.       There are quite a few subject categories.
  • It has online community groups on which you can post questions and comments.
  • They also have Community champions to make sure the community is a safe, supportive place to be.

Surviving Asperger’s Syndrome

This on-line publication takes the form of brief bullet points divided up into chapters.        See:  Survival guide

Tips for married couples

This is for the partner of someone with Asperger’s:  Chat website

Fear busting

Here are some tips on  tackling fear .

Soap Operas

These can provide a handy way to improve emotional literacy and people skills.      Soaps focus on emotional issues and lay it on with a trowel.      For example, see  Roy Cropper  from Coronation Street.

Moving House

Children on the autistic spectrum can find the idea of moving house unsettling, but there are things could do that might help.

  • Tell him obvious things, repeatedly, e.g. that he is moving too.
  • Tell him what familiar things you are taking, e.g. items of furniture.
  • Try to re-create his old bedroom from day one.      This is not a good time for a revamp.
  • Use the same bedding & PJs for continuity.       If necessary leaving them unwashed would be even better.
  • Get PC running in new home from day one.       Buy that computer game he has always wanted and give him free access to the PC around the time of the move.

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