Category Archives: Students

Personal reflections

Adult diagnosis

Here is a discussion that starts with a surprising diagnosis of Autism at the age of 16.       It goes on to consider issues of identity with borderline Asperger’s.

They thought I was lazy …

They thought I was lazy…when I was just actually autistic.       This is one of many perceptive reflections on life through one female Asperger’s lens.         Click icon for article.

Socially acceptable

The writer shares some difficulties he experiences trying to mix socially with neurotypical people.       Click icon for article.

What is Neurotypical?

Writers often ask “What is Asperger’s Syndrome?”       The boot is on the other foot in this article.        For example, it may be difficult to get an opinion from a Neurotypical person.        Click icon for article.

The decline and fall of “autism”

A mother of two children with profound developmental impairments questions Simon Baron-Cohen’s description of autism as a variant like left-handedness or homosexuality.       Click icon for article.

All a bit autistic?

No, we are not all a little bit autistic.       Click icon for article.

Stranger darker better

Here is a message to all the self-diagnosed autistic people.        Click icon for article.        It concludes, Trust yourself.     Trust the research you’ve done.  …      Self-diagnosis grants us access to our community and resources to help us live better lives and self-understanding that can radically change how we live.       See also about Sabrina.

Talk normally please

Ido is non-verbal but this does not stop him from keeping a blog.         In his mother’s guest post she says,  I thought, “Okay, say something now before this becomes a pattern and he becomes insulted.”      As tactfully as I could, I mentioned to her that Ido doesn’t like “high five.” He wants to be spoken to normally.  …      Regularly, Ido gets letters from parents telling him that they now speak normally to their child with autism, thanks to his advice, and that their child is responding positively.        Click icon for article.

Bob Christian

A father, husband, and poet on the autism spectrum.        His favourite poets are spoken word artists like Neil Hillman.         Click icon to see his profile.        See blog for more contributors to Learn from Autistics.          See also Poems.

Why do you do that?

  • All my fingers in perfect order moving in a rhythmic order its calming to me like the sight of a quiet ocean gently coming in and out to shore.
  • Having all the same foods creates less anxiety and means I don’t have to starve myself.
  • Without those plans I have no idea what to expect or whats going on, I depend on those plans to live and without them I just fall apart.

Click icon to read article.

Autism’s Resident Experts

This article it titled, Oh, the Autistic Humanity … of Neurotypical Rejection of Autism’s Resident Experts.          Perhaps the nub of the article is,  I mean, we’re right here, in all our autistic glory, with tons of insight and experience just waiting to be tapped. …     Yet, we’re pushed to the side, and research and conversations march on without us.          The author describes herself a former social scientest because, I believe, based on my own observations, that it’s impossible for any of us to interact with others and not be personally affected / involved.      Humans are not built that way, and pretending otherwise just seemed like a big ole exercise in but-we’re-really-a-science! hubris.            Clickicon to read article.

Proud to be

This is my first April as an autistic person.       I know I’m autistic and I know Charles is too, but I also know now that we are not lost.        Click icon to see.

Understanding the spectrum

The title of this article is, Why I Want More People To Understand That Autism Is A Spectrum.         The author writes, When I speak to others I often get, “Oh, you have autism? I would have never known.” That is something many of us have to face on the spectrum.             Click the icon on the left to read the article

Doc iconTrying to blend in

Passing is not good for your mental health.        It teaches us to have shame in who we are.       It gives a message that we are not good enough.

Passing takes up so much of an autistic person’s limited social energy that we go home and have sensory meltdowns the minute we can be alone.         When I was a child – and even now with work – I could hold things together through the school day but would come home and fall apart.

Of battered aspect

Doing damns the darkness.          Every now and then I am reminded, with a shock, that the world isn’t what it used to be for many people with intellectual disabilities.

Heightened senses

An adult on the spectrum wants others to see where she is coming from.        Click picture to read her essay.

They may not always understand exactly what you’re saying or where you are coming from when you explain things to them, as they themselves are in a different reality completely, only connected to yours when the waves are crossed and you can look through their eyes with both understanding and patient communication, the thing many struggle with.

Dear autism parent …

This is a wide ranging letter from someone with autism to autism parents, with comments at the bottom of the page.         I decided, aged 36, to request an assessment for autism because things have not been easy for me.      You see, there’s lots about my autism that isn’t visible.      And yet, my experience of the world shares some similarities with that of your child.             The author calls herself Mamma Pineapple.

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Associated conditions

Mental health

The National Autistic Society has a page about mental health and autism.      Click page icon to view.        Also, Autistica has produced a help sheet about autism and mental health.         Click PDF icon to view.

Handwriting 

Options has produced a help sheet about developing early handwriting skills for children with autism.         Click icon to view.      (new)         See also:

  • Letter dominoes is a game that is easy to make yourself.
  • Here is a video tutorial setting out several aids – including pencil grips.        It offers insight into what does and does not work.
  • This video tutorial demonstrates the sock method of teaching proper pencil grip.
  • This video tutorial demonstrates writing 3 letters of the alphabet.        There are more related videos in the margin, too.
  • Some mums provide a sloping board/surface to write on.

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Alexithymia

A condition involving lack of empathy.         A difficulty in experiencing, expressing, and describing emotional responses.         Some with autism have this lack of empathy but many do not.        Click icon for an easy reading interview.        Professor Geoff Bird says that alexithymia and autism are independent of each other.

For detailed and definitive information see:  Alexithymia info 

Dyslexia

Dyslexia is a common learning difficulty that mainly affects the way people read and spell words.        Click icon for an easy reading introduction.         Scroll down for comments.

  • For more detail, see  British Dyslexia Association  (BDA).         Includes FAQ.        They also have resources for parents.         And much more …
  • See Dislexia outreach for support in Lincolnshire.        They support parents, teachers, and pupils.
  • See also under handwriting aids below.

Demand avoidance

Pathological demand avoidance (PDA) – part of the autism spectrum.            Click page icon on the left for PDA society website and PDF icon for a PDA Society PowerPoint presentation.

Demand avoidance sounds similar to Oppositional defiance, so what is the difference?         In the PDF file above, page 29, it says that PDA is an autism spectrum disorder rooted in anxiety, whereas ODD is not.

Echolalia

  • Here is an introduction to echolalia.        Mimicry is an efficient way to experiment with different sounds and practice emerging social language skills. 
  • This article offers a medical analysis.        People with echolalia repeat noises and phrases that they hear.      They may not be able to communicate effectively because they struggle to express their own thoughts.         If they struggle to do anything other than repeat what has been said, they may have echolalia.         Some children with autism are regularly tested for this during their speech lessons.
  • Here is a more detailed article about echolalia with autism Even echolalia is a normal way to learn language.        Most children use echolalia to learn language.         The majority of children babble in a rhythmic way, which is actually mimicking the cadence of our language. 
  • In adults Echolalia should normally disappear around two and half years of age.         It is often considered abnormal if it persists beyond age 3 years.

Dysgraphia

Dysgraphia is having difficulty learning to:     1. recognise and write letters and words       2.  link sounds, speech and writing.

  • For an easy reading introduction, see  About Health.           See links for more detailed information.
  • This dedicated Dysgraphia website has been written by a mother and university lecturer, and an undergraduate with dysgraphia.

Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is a specific difficulty with arithmetic, or maths.

  • The Dyscalculia website looks pretty definitive.           It offers a handy introduction
  • For more information see Dyscalculia Talks.         It has articles to read as well as video clips to watch.
  • The Dyscalculia Conference website is aimed at professionals, but might be interesting to anyone teaching their own child at home.

Dyspraxia

A Developmental co-ordination disorder.

  • For an easy reading introduction, see  NHS Choices.          Scroll down for comments.
  • The Dyspraxia Foundation has a great deal to offer, including introductionchildren,   FAQ.         See also:  Home for helpline and  Local groups – including Leicstershire and Peterborough
  • You may be surprised to learn that it can affect speech, see Speech and Language.

Doc iconSpecific Learning Difficulties

SpLD is an umbrella term used to cover a range of frequently co-occurring difficulties, more commonly:

  • Dyslexia
  • Dyspraxia / DCD
  • Dyscalculia
  • D.D / A.D.H.D

Specific Learning Difficulties (or SpLDs), affect the way information is learned and processed. They are neurological (rather than psychological), usually run in families and occur independently of intelligence. They can have significant impact on education and learning and on the acquisition of literacy skills.

In general, a student may be diagnosed with a SpLD where there is a lack of achievement at age and ability level, or a large discrepancy between achievement and intellectual ability.

See also an analytical view

Tourettes

Tourette’s syndrome is a condition that causes a person to make involuntary sounds and movements called tics.        See introduction

  • Tourettes Action website seems to be the go-to place for all things Tourettes.        Click icon on the left to browse.         They have a Find support menu.
  • The Lincolnshire support group meets in Lincoln and Grantham.
  • Discussions :  Netmums         Tourettes & Aspergers
  • Facebook videos might be worth a look.

Swallowing difficulties

Click icon to view help sheet for people with Autism about Dysphagia by a speech and language therapist.

Epilepsy

Autistica has produced a help sheet about autism and epilepsy.         Click icon to view.  See also Epilepsy Action:  Website             Information           Help & support

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GAIN logo - thumbnailPlease be aware that we, at GAIN, are not qualified to give advice.              See disclaimer.

 

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Preparing for change

Grades are not everything

A Masters degree graduate feels that her difficulties with social skills was overlooked at school because her grades were good.       Click icon to see what she has to say.

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See also  Education & Learning  under Schooling problems at the bottom of the page.        For a few life skills college courses see College and University.

Prepare for big changes

The National Autistic Society website has many pages to help prepare for the big changes in a pupil’s life.          Click icon to browse.

Circles of support

Circles of support offers support during a transitional time in the focus person’s life such as a change of school or moving on; by using the support of friends, family, support networks, paid professionals and staff.         A Lincolnshire service.        Click page icon for more information or leaflet preview.

Education beyond 16

Click icon for a brief introduction to the support and options for education beyond 16 .

Support beyond 16

There were changes in 2014.         Click icon for an easy reading leaflet about the changes.

Preparing for adulthood

Here is the Moving on and preparing for adulthood booklet co-produced by Lincolnshire County Council and the Pelican Trust.
It is part of the Promoting Independence Project in response to requests for information from young people with SEND and Parent / Carers.           Click icon on the left to browse.

The Preparing for Adulthood programme (PfA) provides expertise and support to local authorities and their partners to embed preparing for adulthood from the earliest years.          It is part of the delivery support for the SEN and disability reforms.           See:  website         What we do          Resources            See their Youtube page for videos.

Independence

For an more about developing independence click icon.

 

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GAIN logo - thumbnailPlease be aware that we, at GAIN, are not qualified to give advice.              See disclaimer.

Technical

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Zoom in

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Statistics

  • Visitor numbers to this site were increasing during 2016
  • Many of them were from outside the UK, particularly the USA
  • A sizable number use the RSS feed
  • As a matter of interest, while Windows is the most popular operating system Linux is quite popular amongst our visitors too.      Please be aware that trying out a version of Linux is technically ambitious, though.      This how to guide might give a rough idea of what is involved, however.
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PDF files

When you click the icon show on the left, the text may sometimes appear uneven, as shown on the right.          Simply click the  +  icon at the top of the display once or twice and it should become much more readable.

Attribution:   Icon by Ethandcltd – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0,
https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=48198391

Interest News – Bourne events …

  • Money for nothing – Dire Straits trubute band in Bourne, 12th Apr 2019.       Bourne CiCLE feltival men’s road race, 1st Sep.
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  • Queen on scheduled train:  This year, 2018, the queen caught a regular rail service to Norfolk for her Christmas break at Sandringham.        See pictures        In 2017 she recreated the first rail journey by a British monarch – Queen Victoria.
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  • Tour de France: 2018:   This year Le Tour takes place Saturday July 7th to Sunday July 29th, ITV4 coverage as last year.          See:  Official guide         ITV guide            Update:   Did you know that one of the teams are using disc brakes on their bikes?
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  • Tour de France: 2017:   This year Le Tour takes place Saturday July 1st to Sunday July 23rd, ITV4 week days: 11am – Highlights followed by live coverage.        7pmHighlights.           Weekend live coverage times vary.
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  • General election, Thursday 8th June 2017 – Easy read manifestos
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  • Tour de France: 2016 coverage:  Stage 7 win.            In the end Chris Froome notched up his third tour win for Britain and the Sky team.           See:  Pictures            Official guide            2015 video           Froome on 2016
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  • New Eurostar trains         Eurostar - Valero e320Eurostar are replacing their original French built train sets with new German Siemens trains.           There are plans to extend services to destinations in the Netherlands and Germany.          “In September 2013, Eurostar announced that its new service between London and Amsterdam, intended to begin operation in December 2016, would be operated by the trains.        The first Class 374 set entered service in November 2015, ahead of the full launch of the new type; the receipt of the safety authorization from the Intergovernmental Commission was received earlier than expected, allowing Eurostar to begin utilizing the type on a small number of services for in-service testing.”.            See Wikipedia for more information.
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  • “Einstein’s gravitational waves ‘seen’ from black holes.”        “Scientists are claiming a stunning discovery in their quest to fully understand gravity.”      See  article  complete with video clip and pictures.            In 1916 Albert Einstein predicted that gravity might be found to work like a kind of wave.           See:  PHD Comics         Wikipedia.
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  • Chris Froome wins the 2015 Tour de France cycle race.          See:  The finish        The day before.           The young Columbian runner up might be one to watch next year.
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  • A NASA space probe sped past Pluto in July 2015.           See: article – with pictures from the probe and illustrations.
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  • Steve Morse joined Deep Purple in 1994, and this recording of Smoke on the Water has a particularly good version of the guitar solo.              In the 1970’s most teenage boys knew the solo, and pretty much most of them with a guitar had a go at playing it.

Diversity press

Autistic not weird

This is a website by a special needs tutor with Asperger Syndrome.       Click icon on the right to browse.       For example:  Being different       (new)

Be with that

Danny Raede has discovered for himself ways of understanding and coping with the difficulties he experiences as someone on the spectrum.         Be with that may be a handy idea and technique to help to cope when feeling overwhelmed.        Ciick icon to view and watch video.        See also home page.

Amythest Schaber 

Amythest Schaber is an artist, writer, public speaker and advocate.         In her blog called Neuro Wonderful she offers insight into autistic life, put across in her unique style.        Click page icon to see her range of videos.        For example: What is stimming?         What is autistic burnout?     (new)

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This page is dedicated to publications from the viewpoint of people who do not fit in with today’s prevailing norms, notably Asperger’s Syndrome – and those close to them.

Adults’ experiences

What is it really like to be an autistic adult?          Professor Ian Walker shares his story.          He is a retired university lecturer who was only diagnosed with autism at the age of 71.          Click icon to see article and video clip.          Find more interviews from the series at the bottom of the ITV page.

Why advertising falls flat

This article considers the possibility that people with autism might be savvier consumers.          Click icon to see article.

Autistic Allies

This is a discussion group for members.        They stress that it  is NOT a support group.      Their goal is to eradicate stereotypical images of autism, and to promote an autism-positive stance.         Click icon for Facebook group.          You have to join the group to see content.          See also Austism-positive.

NeuroDivergents

Monique Craine is a blogger, activist and campaigner for NeuroDivergent (ND) rights, AKA Human Rights.            She says, This video was inspired by a Powerpoint presentation which I delivered in the past – which people claimed ‘opened their eyes’ to autism.            It has been receiving praise from the autistic community, autism professionals and parents.            Click play button to watch.

Non-speaking / low-functioning?

I am autistic, non-speaking. I am also labeled “low-functioning”.         This label is a pre-judgment based on what I cannot do.          It makes people look at me with pity instead of trying to get to know me, listen to my ideas.

Difference or dissorder?

This article considers issues linked to the social and medical models of autism.

Dr Dan Edmunds

I know that autism is not a disease and not something to be altered, it is a culture and a mode of being, and through my 17 years of journeying with fellow persons in the spectrum I am increasingly convinced that being autistic is a necessary adaptation to a complex world and that there are unique strengths that are a part of autistic culture.       I see many programs to alter autistic persons as discriminatory, for it seeks to exterminate a culture.       If we treated other cultures the way autistic persons are often treated, there would be outrage.        Facbook small iconBut there are powerful forces convincing people that autistic persons are defective.        Maybe one day this will change, I strive for it.        Dan L. Edmunds                   Click Facebook icon to browse his blog.

Steve Silberman

Steve Silberman is an award-winning science writer and has a lot to say about autism.              For example, Two further developments, thinks Silberman, make life much brighter for people with autism today.         One is social media: “In face-to-face, real-time interactions, people on the spectrum are often overloaded.        Conversation, eye contact, body language, all the little social signals – that can get too much.        Whereas, on the computer, at their own pace, it’s often much more natural to them.”              See article, The man who wants us to embrace autism,                It explores his views and insights.

See writings and media for more of his work.               He is the author of NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversitysee Amazon.               See also Profile

Facbook small iconAutonomous Press

Owned by disabled workers, Autonomous Press seeks to revolutionize academic access.                  This can refer to a lot of things, e.g.  access to higher education, inclusive class environments …                     See About for more information.

Neuro-cosmopolitan

This website could be a treasure trove for the gifted academic or teacher.

  • Here is one of the author’s more accessible articles: Advice to Young Autistics I did learn to navigate the neurotypical social world. But I didn’t approach that task with the intention of trying to change myself in order to “fit in.” I approached it as an adventure in learning my way around an exotic foreign culture.
  • This could be a good starting point for further reading: Neuro-what?

OutlookBe awesome

These links are all from the Ollibean website.                 If you are always questioning things, maybe a bit of a non-conformist, this site could be a useful starting point.

  • Attitudes  –  We need to start to change how non-disabled people see disabled people, and then we can begin demanding a change in attitude.           We have enough true allies to join and support us, and we can demand what we decide we need to live a fulfilling human life.
  • Be awesome   –  Ableism – discrimination against disabled people, often unconscious/implicit.         Ableism brought forth by pity is frustrating.           It gets in the way of possibilities.
  • Universal design  –  When more people participate, everyone wins because human beings learn from each other –   e.g.  Captioned videos, films and TV help with literacy, including literacy of non-disabled people.
  • False choices  –  e.g.  Is autism a disability or a difference?

Asperger United

This is a magazine aimed at adults with Asperger’s Syndrome.             It is published by the National Autistic Society.                Click link below for more information.

AspUtd logo

Original and tribal minds

What started out as an explanation for autistic behaviour has with twelve years of obsessive thought become the basis for a profound shift in thinking about psychology.              See introduction.

Key words

Ableism:  quick          detail
Autism-positive:       article
Aspie:                description
Diversity press:  just the title of this page
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Not getting out

Experiences

Click icon to find out how others have found their way through panic attacks.   (new)        Also, someone with high-functioning Asperger’s describes their own experience dealing with anxiety.

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Introduction

Just a quick tip:  perhaps you could try using one of the following statements:

  1. “I can be anxious and still deal with the situation.”
  2. “I’ll just let my body do its thing. This will pass.”
  3. “This anxiety won’t hurt me, even if it doesn’t feel good”.
  4. “This feeling isn’t comfortable or pleasant, but I can accept it.”

More detailPanic attacks etc

  • What is the range of symptoms?
  • Can people with high functioning Asperger’s be severely effected by
    anxiety?      It seems so:
    – High functioning autism is associated with anxiety disorder.
    – A discussion of the link between high IQ and anxiety
  • Can virtual reality help with not getting out?      Video           Text           Research

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GAIN logo - thumbnailPlease be aware that we, at GAIN, are not qualified to give advice.              See disclaimer.

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Resources

For holidays in Lincolnshire see Take a break.

Services

Here is an NHS booklet intended to be a good place to start for families to access appropriate support and services in Lincolnshire for children and young people with additional needs and complex difficulties / Autism Spectrum Disorders.         Click picture to download the booklet – at bottom of page.

Family services directory

The Lincolnshire County Council on-line Family Services Directory is the go-to place to find out about services.        Click SEND icon on the left for the SEN and Disability section.        It covers services for children with disability as well as education.        Click page icon on the right for the home page.

The directory is likely to be the place with the most up-to-date information.        Service providers can update their own entries.

Council website

The Lincolnshire County Council website has many pages of information for parents of children with Special Educational Needs and Disability.        Click icon to browse.        It includes Short breaks and ESCO.       The website also has a Things to do page.       GAIN website also has:  Take a break      ESCO support

For the Council information about social care assessment and support in Lincolnshire  see Children with disabilities social care.       Click icon to browse.       Short breaks and either social care or direct payments may be available.        To find out how to arrange an assessment contact the Customer Service Centre on 01522 782 111.

Main County Council switchboard:  01522 846 911.

Helplines

Phone iconDoc iconThe National Autistic Society have an on-line form as well as a phone number.       But before you call or email check to see how they can help.        They are much in demand, so it might be worth a look.        See also  Specialist advice & information services.         See icons to the left for the next step.          The Specialist Advice and information services page presents parents, carers and people with autism with a list of their specialist services to choose from.        If the helpline is busy you could try their Find answer on-line page.

Phone iconChild Autism UK is an autism charity.         See website.         It used to be called Peach.         Click the phone icon to see how they might be able to help.

Phone iconThe Challenging Behaviour Foundation offers telephone and email support to family carers and professionals caring for children and adults with severe learning disabilities and challenging behaviour.

Childcare

Lincolnshire Family Information Services Looking for childcare?       Want to know if you can get help paying for childcare?       Want activities to do with your children?       Looking for children and family services?               We have lots of information for families, child carers and professionals …   

For specialist SEN helplines see SEN/EHC Support.              Also, do blogs and on-line communities sound interesting?            If so, see Tips and What is it like?.

CAMHS

Your Child’s GP might make a referral to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS).        They are behind the Cinema on St Catherine’s Road in Grantham.

For official information see:      booklet         webpage         Grantham         referral guide
See also what the forums say:  referral         shambles        The replies are worth a look.       Those with good experiences may be less motivated to speak out on these forums, but if you look carefully you should find some.        Here is an insider’s view         (new)

One of our autism mums said,  I’ve had multiple dealings with CAMHS.   They can diagnose and prescribe medication so they offer a variety of help as well as behaviour management.    I find them excellent to deal with and they’ve been a fabulous support to us.

See also SEN support about the Lincolnshire Educational psychology service.

SHARE

SHARE (Support, Help, Advice, Respite, Encouragement) is an independent family support and guidance service in Lincolnshire, incorporating a parent run support group.         It is for families with children up to 25 on the autistic spectrum.          Click icon for their webpage.          See also news

Action for Children

  • They offer a range of services for families with disabled children.
  • Their Lincolnshire Short breaks can help to make leisure and social activities more accessible.             Here are some short breaks stories.
  • Here are search results for Lincolnshire using icon at top right of screen.
  • Here are some frequently asked questions about Personal Budgets.
  • Disability Lincolnshire, is part of Action for Children.               Click icon for their Facebook page.

Lincolnshire Carers Service

The Lincolnshire Carers Service is a partnership between Lincolnshire County Council and Carers FIRST.        This service includes parents of children.          First point of contact is the County Council’s Customer Service Centre:   01522 782 224  or  carersservice@lincolnshire.gov.uk         Click icon for the range of support for carers.

Carers FIRST is the new name for Carers connect.         They provide emotional and practical support, advice, information, guidance and offer statutory carer assessments, social groups, short break respite, activities trips and more.        Click icon for an introduction to Carers FIRST.        Phone the number above to access Carers FIRST services.

For more information see:  introduction        website         out of hours        history

Children’s therapy

Find out about NHS children’s therapy services in Lincolnshire, e.g.  information       guidance       FAQ          Click icon to browse.

Homestart

Home-Start Lincolnshire are here to help – for free.       If you are a family with young children in need of a helping hand – we’ve got a trained volunteer who will offer friendship, emotional and practical support through weekly home visits for as long as is needed
Click icon to view their website.         See also: support      Grantham       other local contacts             01507 308 030             enquiries@homestartlincolnshire.co.uk

Family Court

If you need legal support for a case about your child, maybe to do with care or adoption, you may want to know about CAFCAS.        It stands for Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service.      Their website offers information for Children and Teenagers as well as Grown ups.

Here are some Top tips for dealing with CAFCAS from Net Mums.         Also, it might also be worth bearing in mind that the people at CAFCAS may not know how to deal with a child on the autistic spectrum.         This link to the National Autistic Society web page  About autism  could be useful if you wanted to print off some explanations that might help them to understand your child.

Things seem to have Improved according to Ofsted since 2008, when they found Progress inadequate, though their 2014 report also points to
areas where there is room for improvement.        The Guardian reported on apparent Success in 2012 of a management initiative to make the “health and wellbeing of social workers a priority in the workplace”, which, the Guardian said, includes CAFCAS .         So there seems to be some good news.

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GAIN logo - thumbnailPlease be aware that we, at GAIN, are not qualified to give advice.              See disclaimer.

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Fatigue

ME/Chronic Fatigue

Here is the NHS guide to Chronic Fatigue (CFS/ME).

The ME Association states, The core symptom of ME/CFS is profound and disabling fatigue, which almost always affects both physical and mental functioning.     The fatigue and other symptoms are not caused by ongoing excessive exertion and are not relieved by rest.     One of the most striking features of this fatigue is what is termed ‘post-exertional malaise’ or ‘post-exertional symptom exacerbation’.        See  symptoms & assessment for more information.

What is ME/CFS?

The ME Association is a UK national support group for people with ME.       Click icon for their thorough description of ME.

More generally …

Autistic burnout seems to be an informal phrase used in the autistic community.       Click play button to watch a video by Amythest Schaber.        She seems to have a clear understanding of the issues and presents them well.        For example, Is it possible to become more autistic?

  • They thought I was lazy … when I was just actually autistic.        This is one of many perceptive reflections on life through one female Asperger’s lens.        See article.
  • Is it just me, or do other people with autism feel tired all the time?       See autism & tiredness to view article.

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GAIN logo - thumbnailPlease be aware that we, at GAIN, are not qualified to give advice.              See disclaimer.

Stimming

Stimming can be a valuable coping mechanism for people on the Autistic Spectrum but there may sometimes be better alternatives to foster – as outlined on the NAS page below.         See also Sensory sensitivity page.

What is stimming?       Why do it?

The BBC offers a handy introduction to stimming, including why people on the autistic spectrum do it.       Click icon to veiw.

Amythest Schaber is an artist, writer, public speaker and advocate.         In her video about stimming she offers insight into autistic life as an adult, put across in her unique style, as part of her Neuro Wonderful blog.       Click play button to watch.

The National Autistic Society (NAS) website covers stimming under the broader heading of obsessions, repetitive behaviour and routines, which puts a slightly different slant on it.        They also take quite a broad view of what might be done about it.        Click icon to view.        See also Mental health and autism about OCD.

The website Ambitious about Autism focuses more narrowly on the topic under the heading Repetitive behaviours and stimming.       Click Twitter icon to find a link to their website – it is in the left margin.        Look for the magnifying glass icon on the site and search for stimming.

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GAIN logo - thumbnailPlease be aware that we, at GAIN, are not qualified to give advice.              See disclaimer.