Category Archives: Adults

For adults with autism, their parents or carers

Professionals

Employment

Ambitious About Autism offer a range of resources to help get more autistic people into work.      Click icon to find their Employment section.       In 2021 they launched their toolkit to help support autistic young people into the workplace.       new

National autistic society

The National Autistic Society has many pages about professional practice.       Click page icon to browse their professional practice pages or twitter icon for their Autism practice feed.

Life Support DVD’s

This UK based site offers sex education DVD’s.       Click icon for You, Your Body, Growing Up, Relationships and Sex.       It is their SEND menu option.       See previews:   Kylie’s private world       Jason’s private world 

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This is a page for professionals who may be quite new to autism.        See also:  Autism awareness        SEN/EHC Information         Sensory sensitivity for Sensory Processing Disorder under SPD.

Flexi-schooling?

There is a shared classroom and home-schooling approach to education that may be worth considering for some autistic children.       Click icon for the National Autistic Society’s page on the subject.

Finished at school

Ambitious About Autism published a guide at the end of their Finished at School (FaS) campaign.       The learning it captured is intended to support colleges in developing effective practice to support learners with autism to make a successful transition from school to college and into adult life.        Click icon for guide.

See also:  www.ambitiousaboutautism.org.uk         Twitter has a link to the website at the top of its display.       Once there navigate to:

Menu > Who we are > Campaigns > Finished at School 

Team Around the Child

As a guide, a TAC is required where two or more support services are involved.       Click icon for Lincolnshire Council guidance for professionals.

Here is a one stop resource for those in need of Teams Around a Child: Early Help Lincolnshire       Here is the TAC website establised by Peter Limbrick who developed TAC.

TEACCH

Treatmentand Educationof Autistic and related Communication Handicapped Children (TEACCH) is another broad brush approach to working with children or adults with autism.        It has more to do with values and priorities than specific techniques.        Click icon for more detail.
The NAS Early bird programme draws on the TEACCH approach.        See also:  Autism UK       Wikipedia

Training courses

Supporting inclusion

Click icon for Lincolnshire Council pages about supporting inclusion.       It covers aspects of special educational needs & disabilityfor professionals.

Lincolnshire has four integrated locality teams.       SENCOs from all early years providers, registered childminders and out of school club managers can request Early Years inclusion support.        See Early years support         It has an inclusion support referral form at the bottom of the page and email addresses.

Working together team

The Working Together Team offers support to schools and academies for students with a wide range of social communication and / or learning needs.        See also:  detail          SEN Support – Scroll down to Social communication outreach.

Flash Cards

Sparklebox offer free teaching aids for children with special educational needs.          Here is the Speech page.        Their terms of use are brief.

Co-ordination

Early years can extend as far as the age of 18 with ESCO.       This is short for Early years Support Care & Co-ordination,

Tips & issues

Family relationships

The National Autistic Society has a range of guides for navigating family relationships, and advice for parents, siblings, and children on how to support their autistic family member.       Click icon to find out more.

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See also Coronavirus resources

Spectrum magazine

The National Autistic Society publishes The spectrum magazine, containing autistic art, poetry and prose.       Created by autistic people, its content covers all things autism.         Click icon to find out more.       For example Oct 2020 issue.

Contact

Contact – for families with disabled children – was founded by parents.     They seem to know what is what.      Click icon to get to the point.

The podcast university

What to do if you are at a loose end?       This is basically a plug for a number of BBC podcasts that might pique your interest.       Click icon to view.

Thinking styles

  • Temple Grandin says that there are three autistic thinking styles:  visual thinkers, verbal specialists and pattern thinkers.       See post.
  • Autism Toolbox is  a resource to foster inclusion in early learning settings and schools.       it has a section on cognitive theories of autism.

Facbook small iconAutism Discussion

Autism Discussion Page is the title of this Facebook page.       It contains brief articles with comments.       Anyone registered with Facebook can add their own comments.

Making your child happier

This article offers Eleven ways you can make your autistic child’s life easier.

Temple Grandin’s FAQ’s

Temple Grandin is a lady with high-functioning Asperger’s who has made an academic career for herself.       Click icon to browse her Frequently Asked Questions page.       The Ask Temple link, in the top left corner, gives you a form for asking your own question.

Ellen Notbohm

This Facebook page offers a handy starting point for several topics from the author Ellen Notbohm.       The award-winning author is known for her popular books and columns on autism, published worldwide in more than twenty languages.       See the Notes option on the Facebook page for key topics.        She also has a website.      The Blog and Articles menu options might be worth a look.

Facbook small iconAutism on The Mighty

We have a number of links from The Mighty on our website and Facebook page.        This page picks out autism related material from their website.       Click icon to browse.

NetmumsDoc icon

  • The Netmums site has quite a few pages  under the Autism/Asperger’s heading.      Clicking the icon to browse.
  • A number of mothers post a description of their situation on this  site – see:  Preschool        School age         Older children / teenagers.
  • To simply browse Netmums use their search box at the top right corner of the page, but for information about the members’ only areas see their registration page,

Evidence-based optimism

The thinking person’s guide to autism is a forum intended to encourage visitors, To think, ask questions, question the media, and learn from each other       The people behind it say, Autism misinformation clouds and is perpetuated by the Internet.     We want to make accurate information about autism causation and therapies visible, accessible, and centralized.

Christmas 

Ambitious About Autism is publishing a few tips for Christmas under the heading: Include autism this Christmas.      Click icon to view.

Coping skills

Six types of coping skills.      An array of graphics.

The best activities

Ideas about activities for special needs.      After-school and weekend activities for children with disabilities can build self-esteem, skills, friendships and a sense of belonging.

What autism mums do not want to hear

This will ring a few bells for parents of a child on the autistic spectrum.      Things not to say to an autism mum .

Re-charging the batteries

‘Society has programmed us to think, “What kind of mother is she, taking care of herself before her child?”  but that’s completely wrong.’      Here are 10 must dos for parents of children with special needs.

Scope

Scope describes itself as the disability equality charity.

  • Members ask the online community for Support and Information.       There are quite a few subject categories.
  • It has online community groups on which you can post questions and comments.
  • They also have Community champions to make sure the community is a safe, supportive place to be.

Surviving Asperger’s Syndrome

This on-line publication takes the form of brief bullet points divided up into chapters.        See:  Survival guide

Tips for married couples

This is for the partner of someone with Asperger’s:  Chat website

Fear busting

Here are some tips on  tackling fear .

Soap Operas

These can provide a handy way to improve emotional literacy and people skills.      Soaps focus on emotional issues and lay it on with a trowel.      For example, see  Roy Cropper  from Coronation Street.

Moving House

Children on the autistic spectrum can find the idea of moving house unsettling, but there are things could do that might help.

  • Tell him obvious things, repeatedly, e.g. that he is moving too.
  • Tell him what familiar things you are taking, e.g. items of furniture.
  • Try to re-create his old bedroom from day one.      This is not a good time for a revamp.
  • Use the same bedding & PJs for continuity.       If necessary leaving them unwashed would be even better.
  • Get PC running in new home from day one.       Buy that computer game he has always wanted and give him free access to the PC around the time of the move.

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Not getting out

NHS

The NHS section on not getting out, or Agoraphobia, gives us a pretty clear picture of  established scientific opinion.      Click icon to browse.      There is a link to treatment – including self-help tips.

National autistic society

Searching the National Autistic Society site for agoraphobia leads to a page on anxiety.     Although it is aimed at professionals It may provide some useful context.      Click icon to view.      Under the sub-heading Are autistic people more likely to be anxious? they include fear of open spaces and crowds.

They also have a handy article on Anxietyy in autistic adults.       It provides links for autistic adults and parents.

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Introduction

Just a quick tip:  perhaps you could try using one of the following statements:

  1. “I can be anxious and still deal with the situation.”
  2. “I’ll just let my body do its thing. This will pass.”
  3. “This anxiety won’t hurt me, even if it doesn’t feel good”.
  4. “This feeling isn’t comfortable or pleasant, but I can accept it.”

Experiences

Click icon to find out how others have found their way through panic attacks.        Also, someone with high-functioning Asperger’s describes their own experience dealing with anxiety.

More detailPanic attacks etc

  • What is the range of symptoms?
  • Can people with high functioning Asperger’s be severely effected by
    anxiety?      It seems so:
    – High functioning autism is associated with anxiety disorder.
    – A discussion of the link between high IQ and anxiety
  • Can virtual reality help with not getting out?      Video           Text           Research

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Fatigue

ME/Chronic Fatigue

Here is the NHS guide to Chronic Fatigue (CFS/ME).      Click icon to browse.

It seems to have taken a good few years for ME to become widely recognised across the medical profession as a genuine and debilitating condition but things seem to have improved a fair bit in that respect.      This has been in no small part due to the work of groups like the ME Association.      They are a UK national support group for people with ME.      Click icon for their website.

Dr Charles Sheperd talks about his experience of ME in what is ME?       See also:  symptoms & assessment       what you need to know      new

Autism and ME/Chronic fatigue

Autistic burnout seems to be an informal phrase used in the autistic community.      Click play button to watch a video by Amythest Schaber.      She seems to have a clear understanding of the issues and presents them well.       Also:

  • They thought I was lazy … when I was just actually autistic.      This is one of many perceptive reflections on life through one female Asperger’s lens.      See article.
  • Is it just me, or do other people with autism feel tired all the time?      See autism & tiredness to view article.

Money (16+)

Social care & support

The NHS website explains how to pay for care and support, and where you can get help with costs.      Click icon to browse.

Money advice

Here is a website offering popular tools and free, impartial money advice.        It was set up by government.        Click icon to browse.      Lincolnshire County Council also offers information and advice on benefits and finance.      It uses an 0300 number which is charged at the landline rate.       See also Lincolnshire guide to the service.

Citizens advice has several pages about money matters.      See debt & money.      Their Grantham office is at the Guildhall arts centre.       Alternatively, find your local advice centre.

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See Support for carers about Carer’s Allowance for carers of adults.

Benefits

The National Autistic Society has a range of pages about  autism-related benefits.       Click icon to view       They include:

  • Employment & Support Allowance
  • Benefits for young autistic people
  • Benefits for autistic adults

Carers FIRST is the new name for Carers connect.      Click icon for their welfare benefits page.      More broadly, to find out what Carers FIRST has to offer and how it fits in with Lincolnshire Carers Service see Families.

Benefits news

  • Get the latest on the benefits system.       See Disability news
  • Inquiry into disability benefits, led by Frank Field in 2017, ‘deluged’ by tales of despair.           Several themes emerge from the testimony heard by the work and pensions committee.       See article.
  • Exemption from re-assessment for Employment & Support Allowance (ESA) is not as expected, in 2017.       People with life-long or severe disability will only be exempt if they are deemed to be unfit for ‘work-related activity’.        See article.

Housing

Housing benefits or Council tax support may be available if someone in your household is on a low income.      Click icon for specifics.

Transition at age 18

At  age 18 social care support transfers from Children’s Services to Adult Social Care.      Click icon to start the assessment process and arrange personal budgets.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

This is the replacement for DLA for people aged 16-65 with a disability or long term health problem.      It has been in the process of being phased in since 2013.

  • Citizens Advice offer a large number of pages about PIP, all neatly arranged to make it easy to find your way around.
  • The National Autistic Society (NAS) has published an series of pages on the benefit.       The link takes you to the main one.
  • If you want to see what the government has to say about it, you can choose from Overview,  Detail and News.

Universal credit

Contact has produced a page about Universal Credit.        Click icon on the left to view.      They have also launched a campaign about Universal Credit called Counting the cost.       The aim is to stop the cut in benefits for disabled children it represents.

They also have a helpline – with four ways to get in touch:                     

Experiences with work

Getting and keeping jobs

How do people with Asperger’s get and keep jobs?       It can be tricky.       Click icon for discussion.

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I’m not a robot

Why It’s Hard To Keep A Job When You Have Asperger’s, I’m Not a Robot.      Click icon for article    See also about the author.

Issues around rigidity

Heather shares her experience of learning to work on the spectrum.      She talks about coping with her issues around rigidity.       There is a video clip at the top of the page (preceded by an advert).      Be the best you can be at that job because that’s what’s gonna save you if you do make the social blunders, Lesko said.       Click icon for article

Non-profit agencies

John has lost several jobs due to social anxiety.       This article explores the ways in which nonprofit agencies offer help in placing autistic young adults into jobs.      They recommend supports like checklists, clear outlines of rules and procedures, quieter workspaces when possible and short, scheduled breaks for sensory downtime when needed.       Click icon for article

Associated conditions

Demand avoidance

Pathological demand avoidance (PDA) – part of the autism spectrum.         Click page icon on the left for PDA society website.       See also: Understanding PDA from the PDA society.

Click Facebook icon for the PDA support group – a large Facebook group.      new

Demand avoidance sounds similar to Oppositional defiance, so what is the difference?        In the PDF file above, page 29, it says that PDA is an autism spectrum disorder rooted in anxiety, whereas ODD is not.

Dysgraphia

Dysgraphia is having difficulty learning to:     1. recognise and write letters and words       2.  link sounds, speech and writing.

  • For an easy reading introduction, see  About Health.      See links for more detailed information.
  • Here is a collection of scientific presentations:  Science direct       They address Specific learning disabilities and creativity.       new

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Demand avoidance

Pathological demand avoidance (PDA) is a profile that describes those whose main characteristic is to avoid everyday demands and expectations to an extreme extent.      Click icon to find out more.      See also: PDA Society        slide show

Mental health

The National Autistic Society has a page about mental health and autism.       Click page icon to view.        Also, Autistica has produced a help sheet about autism and mental health.       Click PDF icon to view.

Here is a handy guide to Healthy coping skills for uncomfortable emotions written by a psychotherapist.         (new)

Patients may be referred to a psychiatrist for associated mental health issues.       See NHS introduction.        Ambitious about Autism has produced a guide to making the most of an appointment.

Executive Functioning

Executive functions are the brain’s self-management system.        Problems with executive function can be linked to autistic traits in later life.      Click icon for Options help sheet.       It starts with James at school.

For more examples and how to address them read about Josh in this article.

Handwriting 

Options has produced a help sheet about developing early handwriting skills for children with autism.        Click icon to view.      (new)         See also:

  • Letter dominoes is a game that is easy to make yourself.
  • Here is a video tutorial setting out several aids – including pencil grips.      It offers insight into what does and does not work.
  • This video tutorial demonstrates the sock method of teaching proper pencil grip.
  • This video tutorial demonstrates writing 3 letters of the alphabet.       There are more related videos in the margin, too.
  • Some mums provide a sloping board/surface to write on.

Dyslexia

Dyslexia is a common learning difficulty that mainly affects the way people read and spell words.       Click icon for an easy reading introduction.        Scroll down for comments.

  • For more detail, see  British Dyslexia Association  (BDA).      They also have resources for parents.       And much more …
  • See Dislexia outreach for support in Lincolnshire.      They support parents, teachers, and pupils.
  • See also under handwriting aids below.

Echolalia

  • Here is an introduction to echolalia.       Mimicry is an efficient way to experiment with different sounds and practice emerging social language skills. 
  • This article offers a medical analysis.       People with echolalia repeat noises and phrases that they hear.      They may not be able to communicate effectively because they struggle to express their own thoughts.        If they struggle to do anything other than repeat what has been said, they may have echolalia.        Some children with autism are regularly tested for this during their speech lessons.
  • Here is a more detailed article about echolalia with autism Even echolalia is a normal way to learn language.      Most children use echolalia to learn language.       The majority of children babble in a rhythmic way, which is actually mimicking the cadence of our language. 
  • In adults Echolalia should normally disappear around two and half years of age.      It is often considered abnormal if it persists beyond age 3 years.

Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is a specific difficulty with arithmetic, or maths.

  • The Dyscalculia website looks pretty definitive.         It offers a handy introduction
  • For more information see Dyscalculia Talks.       It has articles to read as well as video clips to watch.
  • The Dyscalculia Conference website is aimed at professionals, but might be interesting to anyone teaching their own child at home.

Dyspraxia

A Developmental co-ordination disorder.

  • For an easy reading introduction, see  NHS Choices.        Scroll down for comments.
  • The Dyspraxia Foundation has a great deal to offer, including introductionchildren,   FAQ.       See also:  Home for helpline and  Local groups – including Leicstershire and Peterborough
  • You may be surprised to learn that it can affect speech, see Speech and Language.

Doc iconSpecific Learning Difficulties

SpLD is an umbrella term used to cover a range of frequently co-occurring difficulties, more commonly:

  • Dyslexia
  • Dyspraxia / DCD
  • Dyscalculia
  • D.D / A.D.H.D

Specific Learning Difficulties (or SpLDs), affect the way information is learned and processed. They are neurological (rather than psychological), usually run in families and occur independently of intelligence. They can have significant impact on education and learning and on the acquisition of literacy skills.

In general, a student may be diagnosed with a SpLD where there is a lack of achievement at age and ability level, or a large discrepancy between achievement and intellectual ability.

See also an analytical view

Tourettes

Tourette’s syndrome is a condition that causes a person to make involuntary sounds and movements called tics.       See introduction

  • Tourettes Action website seems to be the go-to place for all things Tourettes.      Click icon on the left to browse.       They have a Find support menu.
  • The Lincolnshire support group meets in Lincoln and Grantham.
  • Discussions :  Netmums        Tourettes & Aspergers
  • Facebook videos might be worth a look.

Swallowing difficulties

Click icon to view help sheet for people with Autism about Dysphagia by a speech and language therapist.

Epilepsy

Autistica has produced a help sheet about autism and epilepsy.       Click icon to view.  See also Epilepsy Action:  Website           Information         Help & support

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Wider Area

Leicestershire support

  • Leicestershire Autistic Society is a volunteer led organisation.       See website       Support/activity      updated
  • Leicestershire Support for Carers is a community based organisation run by Voluntary Action South Leicestershire      See Website         See also In Your Area, e.g.  Organisations in Melton
  • ADHD Solutions is an independent initiative that works across Leicestershire and Rutland.       They aim to improve the life chances of children, young people and adults.       See website
  • Get the right help for adults with a learning disability.       The Leicestershire Learning Disability Partnership Board has a page about Living independently at home.

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There are some county-wide services in Lincolnshire and the surrounding area.      See also More information for Lincolnshire Autism Partnership Board.

Lincolnshire Autistic Society

The society offers information on Autism, support groups and county updates.       They organise a conference each year, in March – see Related events.       It is very well attended and GAIN is regularly represented there.

Click icon above to view the society’s website, including contact details and up-coming events.      The site was launched in August 2015.

Lincolnshire Parent Carer Forum

This is the new name for Lincolnshire Parent Carer Council.      They are an independent small charity run by volunteers made up of parent carers of children with special educational needs (SEN) and disabilities.      See FAQ for more about them.

Click icon for their home page and see what is happening in Lincolnshire.

SEND

Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) provision was reformed in 2014.              Education, Health and Care (EHC) plans are for children with complex needs.       See:

  • Cambridgeshire for more information about SEN in Cambridgeshire.                See also EHC
  • Leicestershire for more information about SEN in Leicestershire.                       See also FAQ
  • Nottinghamshire for more information about SEN in Nottinghamshire.            See also SEND leaflet

Autism Links

Find charities, support groups, and specialist service providers in your part of the UK.       They also offer information and resources.       Click icon to search or browse.

North Lincolnshire

The Carers’ Support Service is a charity that serves North and North East Lincolnshire.       Click icon then select your region to browse.      They have a page for young carers in North East Lincolnshire.

See also: SEND for North East Lincolnshire Council.

Nottinghamshire

  • Here is an introduction to local support groups in the Nottinghamshire area.       It includes several in Nottingham city and suburbs.
  • Autism East Midlands aim to to ensure people with autism can live their lives with dignity, choice and independence – see About us.      They do a lot in Nottinghamshire, particulary in the Nottingham area.       Have a look at Family services.       They have Family support hubs in Nottingham and Newark.        For their Home page click icon on the right.       Once you are in the Family Services section, navigate via the left hand column for specific geographic locations.         Here are their  Admission criteria  and  Application form.       See also Adult support under Autism East Midlands.
  • With Family Support Directory visitors can search a large database.      After an initial search there are options down the left hand side to narrow things down.       Alternatively, the Search option along the top of the page offers a list of categories.
  • Nottingham Autism Support Services offers a range of paid-for services.       As a group of ex teaching assistants working in special education, the founders recognised the need to have professional, properly qualified and experienced staff to work with people on the Autistic spectrum.

Handy links

Autism Links

Wellbeing 2021

Gardens & woods

The Friendly garden, at Eagle Hall farm, is the location for a range of garden related events organised by the Sage Gardener.      They have made changes to the way they do things to make events COVID safe.       Click icon to find out more.      There appear to be dates for up-coming events for 2021.       See also map.

Hillside community garden is at the back of Lincoln County Hospital.      It is the site for Green Synergy’s current project.      See Related calendar to find out about their pre-employability opportunities for people with mental health issues between April & June 2021.

Hill holt wood is a woodland social enterprise.      Check their website to see if they are open yet.

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Hopelinks

Hopelinks is launching SIRs, a social Isolation responder phone service.       It aims to give carers and people in general the opportunity to chat, often unburdening themselves, in a friendly setting.      Click icon for the brochure.

Ask an autistic

A ladies’ community group plans to launch a blog on 31_March.       Send in your questions to darkside.risingcic@gmail.com or log in to their Facebook page.      Click graphic for an introduction.

Emotional wellbeing

There seem to be some new  resources and services developed to support for emotional wellbeing and mental health in Lincolnshire.       Click icon for GAIN guide.      See also:  Lincolnshire recovery college

Parent to parent

The National Autistic Society has set up a Parent to parent emotional support helpline.       Phone them or fill in an online form to request a phone call.       Click icon to find out more.

Shine

Shine put out a newsletter in 2020 that addresses some issues of current interest.       Click icon to browse.

Shine Lincolnshire, the mental health support network, are putting on virtual coffee mornings for carers in Lincolnshire.      They are regularly on Mon, Wed & Fri on Zoom.      See how they work.      Their website has details about all the latest events.

Shine aims to put people with mental health issues in touch with sources of support.      See Shine basics

Related Calendar

Green Synergy

Green Synergy are putting on events at Hillside Garden, in Lincoln, for people with mental health issues from April – June.      This is part of their Better together partnership project to offer pre-employability opportunities.      Click icon on the left to find out more.
See also their website

They are also running their popular Get Into gardening course as part of their Move employability project for people interested in becoming self-employed gardeners.      Get in touch with them before 15 April for this course.      Other options may also be available.      Click icon on the right to find out more.

They have also launched a project for 10-14 year olds who want to do more for the environment and their community.      Their Green Influencers learn new skills and gain experience and confidence.      The scheme aims to make environmental social action a regular, habitual part of young people’s lives.       Sign up with Brodi: brodi@greensynergy.org.uk       Tel: 07586 777623

Virtual workshops

Check out the online workshops from Lincolnshire Parent Carer Forum, on the left.      They are free to members.       Contact workshops, on the right. are free to all.      Some workshops seek to address issues related to autism, others to foster wellbeing.

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The events on this page are chosen because they may be of interest to a child and/or adult on the autistic spectrum.         See also Local Groups for autism support groups in the South Lincolnshire and beyond.        They put on events in their area.

Worsening health

The NHS is putting on free virtual training during March to help family carers Identify early signs of worsening health in a person with a learning disability.       Click icon to find out more.

Virtual workshops

Lincolnshire Parent Carer Forum are arranging two free series of workshops on Zoom.       One is aimed at friends, relatives and carers of children or adults with additional needs.       Dates range from 5 Jan 10 Feb 2021.      It is called Waving not drowning!        Click icon on the left for Waving not drowning!

They are also putting on LPCF week of SEND.  –  from 25 Jan – 29 Jan.      These are aimed at parents and carers of children with additional needs and professionals who work with them.       Click icon on the right for poster.

More workshops

Contact has quite an extensive range of  virtual workshops for families with additional needs in Jan – Feb.       See workshops for more information.

Positive behaviour

There were a few places left as of Tue afternoon for a Promoting Postivie Behaviour and Autism Workshop.      The workshop will be on Fri 4 Dec at 9:45am and it will be online.       Click icon for details.

Lincoln conference

PAACT is taking bookings for the 22nd Lincoln annual autism conference, Mon 16 – Fri 20 Nov 2020.       Click icon for details.

Lincoln Castle

Only Lincoln Castle grounds are open to the public until 2 Dec.      Click page icon to see visitor update.       Exclusive autism-friendly Explorers sessions at the castle have not yet re-started, though, as of Sept 2020.       Next one may be in the evening.       Click castle icon for background information.

The Groove

The Guildhall Arts Centre has a few virtual events and on-line resources but The Groove has not re-started as of Sept 2020.      Click page icon to set what they have to offer.

Dysart Park Fun Day

Unfortunately Dysart Park Fun Day has been cancelled for 2020.       Click icon and scroll down to find the post cancelling all their events.

Family dog workshops

How  pet dogs can help families that have a child with autism.       Dogs for Good has workshops planned for 2020.
Click icon for locations and dates e.g.  10 Jul Lincoln21 Jul Leicester.      Check again nearer the time for Coronavirus updates.

Makaton course

The Makaton course for Friday 20 Mar at Belton Lane Children’s Centre, Grantham has been cancelled

Messy

Zoo Co presents a visual story with original music, puppets and tap dancing.        Performed by a deaf and hearing cast.       This relaxed performance, created in partnership with ADHD Foundation, will be at the Guildhall Arts Centre in Grantham on 17 Feb.       Click icon for web page or poster thumbnail.

Signposting

Lincolnshire Parent Carer Forum (LPCF) will be putting on a general signposting event on Fri 31 Jan in Hubberts Bridge, near Boston.
It will be free to parents and carers.         Click icon and scroll down for details.        See map

Mental health engagement

Give Lincolnshire NHS your feedback on mental health community rehabilitation.         Click icon  for dates in January around the county.

Cinderella

Polka Dot Pantomimes are performing another season at the Guildhall Arts Centre theatre in Grantham.       Click icon for information about relaxed performances.        They are scheduled for 2nd Jan 2020 at 2pm & 6:30pm.         Phone the booking office using (01476) 406 158  for available seats at:  6:30pm       (2pm  seats sold out.)

Farm quiet hour

Rand Park Farm, near Lincoln, will be putting on a quiet hour for children with additional needs and their families.        Date: 14th Dec, 9 – 10am.        See map        farm layout

Making sense of the senses

Free conference with Dr John Biddolph on Wed 4 Dec at The Fleet, Peterborough.       Click icon for more information including booking details.

Autism Conference

PAACT is taking bookings to attend and for information stands for annual conference in Lincoln on Tuesday 19th Nov 2019.
The venue will be The Showroom, Tritton Road, Lincoln, LN6 7QY.        Click icon for poster.        See also map

Lincoln Castle Explorers

An exclusive opportunity outside of opening hours for children and adults on the autistic spectrum to visit with their families.        Lincoln Castle Explorers, 2nd Nov, 9am – 10am.        Click page icon for event details and to book or castle icon about autism-friendly opening.        See map.

Makaton course

An early years specialist will be running a Makaton course on Friday Oct 4th at Belton Lane Children’s Centre, Grantham.       It will run from 9.30 – 12.30pm and then 12.30pm until 3.30pm with a working lunch.       She will cover Level 1 in the morning and Level 2 in the afternoon.      The cost is £15 per level payable to the trainer on the day.        Morning session recommended for parents.       If you would like to attend contact: ella.mayfield@lincolnshire.gov.uk         See Speech & language about Makaton.

Signposting

Lincolnshire Parent Carer Forum (LPCF) will be putting on a general signposting event on Wed 30 Sep in Market Rasen,        Click icon for details.        See map

Harrowby football match

Harrowby vs Cottesmore football match on Saturday 14 Sep at Harrowby United’s Dickens Road Community Stadium, Grantham, NG31 9QY.       Free entry for under 16’s and carers with Carer’s Allowance letter.        See also map.

Dysart Park Fun Day

GAIN will have a stall at The Dysart Park Fun Day again this year, on Sunday 7th July 2019, 11am to after 4pm.       See::  Facebook      map.

We would be grateful for any donated tombola prizes – old toys, books, food/drink, plants, trinkets, toiletries, teddies, etc (we won’t turn anything down).        Please contact GAIN at
(01476) 855 070 to arrange to drop off or collect.        Thanks to everyone who has already donated prizes, including:  Poundland, Home Bargains, The Works and Subway.

Makaton course

An early years specialist will be running a Makaton course on July 5th at Belton Lane Children’s Centre, Grantham.        It will run from 9.30 – 12.30pm and then 12.30pm until 3.30pm with a working lunch.        She will cover Level 1 in the morning and Level 2 in the afternoon.       The cost is £15 per level payable to the trainer on the day.

Healthy Conversation

The NHS will be holding public engagement drop in sessions around Lincolnshire during May and June.       They want to take soundings about the future of local  health services.

Family dog workshops

Workshops for families with children diagnosed with autism in Lincoln on 7 Jun.       Click icon for details.        See Growing up about Dogs for Good.

Signposting

Lincolnshire Parent Carer Forum (LPCF) will be putting on a general signposting event on Wed 22 May in Lincoln,

Overcoming trauma

Hesley are putting on a free event for parents about overcoming trauma and building resilience for people with autism.        It will be on 8 May in Nottingham.        Click icon for details and to book.

Easter Quest

An exclusive opportunity outside of opening hours for children and adults on the autistic spectrum to visit with their families.        Alice in Wonderland Easter Quest at Lincoln Castle.        Follow the white rabbit and seek out the clues to solve the Mad Hatter’s riddle and claim your chocolate reward.        Sat  20th Apr, 9am – 10am.        Click icon for more information.

East Midlands events

Workshop for parents of special needs children – Coping with Challenging Behaviour.       Wed, 3rd Apr, 10am – 12pm.        25 FREE places available for parents.        At Voluntary Action Rutland, Rutland Community Hub, Oakham, Rutland, LE15 6RB.         To book your free place email westmids.office@contact.org.uk with your name, address and telephone number.        Please also state the age of your child with special needs, and the nature of his/ her disability.        Click poster preview to view.