Personal reflections

The decline and fall of “autism”

A mother of two children with profound developmental impairments questions Simon Baron-Cohen’s description of autism as a variant like left-handedness or homosexuality.           Click icon for article.

All a bit autistic?

No, we are not all a little bit autistic.           Click icon for article.

Stranger darker better

Here is a message to all the self-diagnosed autistic people.           Click icon for article.           It concludes, Trust yourself.     Trust the research you’ve done.  …      Self-diagnosis grants us access to our community and resources to help us live better lives and self-understanding that can radically change how we live.             See also about Sabrina.

Talk normally please

Ido is non-verbal but this does not stop him from keeping a blog.            In his mother’s guest post she says,  I thought, “Okay, say something now before this becomes a pattern and he becomes insulted.”      As tactfully as I could, I mentioned to her that Ido doesn’t like “high five.” He wants to be spoken to normally.  …      Regularly, Ido gets letters from parents telling him that they now speak normally to their child with autism, thanks to his advice, and that their child is responding positively.           Click icon for article.

Bob Christian

A father, husband, and poet on the autism spectrum.             His favourite poets are spoken word artists like Neil Hillman.              Click icon to see his profile.              See blog for more contributors to Learn from Autistics.               See also Poems.

Why do you do that?

  • All my fingers in perfect order moving in a rhythmic order its calming to me like the sight of a quiet ocean gently coming in and out to shore.
  • Having all the same foods creates less anxiety and means I don’t have to starve myself.
  • Without those plans I have no idea what to expect or whats going on, I depend on those plans to live and without them I just fall apart.

Click icon on the right to read article.

Autism’s Resident Experts

This article it titled, Oh, the Autistic Humanity … of Neurotypical Rejection of Autism’s Resident Experts.             Perhaps the nub of the article is,  I mean, we’re right here, in all our autistic glory, with tons of insight and experience just waiting to be tapped. …     Yet, we’re pushed to the side, and research and conversations march on without us.             The author describes herself a former social scientest because, I believe, based on my own observations, that it’s impossible for any of us to interact with others and not be personally affected / involved.      Humans are not built that way, and pretending otherwise just seemed like a big ole exercise in but-we’re-really-a-science! hubris.              Clickicon to read article.

Proud to be

This is my first April as an autistic person.       I know I’m autistic and I know Charles is too, but I also know now that we are not lost.             Click icon to see.

Understanding the spectrum

The title of this article is, Why I Want More People To Understand That Autism Is A Spectrum.            The author writes, When I speak to others I often get, “Oh, you have autism? I would have never known.” That is something many of us have to face on the spectrum.             Click the icon on the left to read the article

Doc iconTrying to blend in

Passing is not good for your mental health.        It teaches us to have shame in who we are.         It gives a message that we are not good enough.

Passing takes up so much of an autistic person’s limited social energy that we go home and have sensory meltdowns the minute we can be alone.         When I was a child – and even now with work – I could hold things together through the school day but would come home and fall apart.

Of battered aspect

Doing damns the darkness.                 Every now and then I am reminded, with a shock, that the world isn’t what it used to be for many people with intellectual disabilities.

Heightened senses

An adult on the spectrum wants others to see where she is coming from.           Click picture to read her essay.

They may not always understand exactly what you’re saying or where you are coming from when you explain things to them, as they themselves are in a different reality completely, only connected to yours when the waves are crossed and you can look through their eyes with both understanding and patient communication, the thing many struggle with.

Dear autism parent …

This is a wide ranging letter from someone with autism to autism parents, with comments at the bottom of the page.             I decided, aged 36, to request an assessment for autism because things have not been easy for me.      You see, there’s lots about my autism that isn’t visible.      And yet, my experience of the world shares some similarities with that of your child.             The author calls herself Mamma Pineapple.

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